review The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales ç PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Read The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

review The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales ç PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ê If a man has lost a leg or an eye he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it because he is no longer there to know it Dr OAry obscenities; who have been dismissed as autistic or retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents If inconceivably strange these brilliant tales illuminate what it means to be huma. I've read a lot of popular science books in my time and in one way or another they have always felt cut from same cloth Similar language used similar structure drawing on the same inspirations After a while it almost feels like you are reading the same book over and over again with only slight variations in contentSo The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat came as a complete breath of fresh air A blast in fact Oliver Sacks has written a book rather unlike anything I've read before both in its content and delivery but also the way it acts as a meta commentary on the field of science communication The book is a collection of case studies from Sacks' career as a neurologist each chapter focusing on a particular patient The stories themselves are fascinating ranging from the titular man who's vision is so neurologically impaired that he literally mistakes his wife for a hat to the woman who lost all sense of proprioception if she did not look at where her body was in space she had no idea where it was However the way that Sacks tells these stories was what gripped me uite apart from other popular science writers he draws on a wide range of inspirations from poetry to philosophy to music to medical papers The text is sumptuous One gets the feeling of a writer who has lived a rich life who has not been confined to one box of academia and who allows his experiences to wash together in a melange of words on the page I loved loved loved itYou could argue that Sacks actually makes a point about this in the final chapter a neurological patient who is a brilliant artist but almost completely incapable of interpersonal communication Reading this at the very end of the book I got the impression that Sacks was holding up the mirror to the way science was written about at the time and still is to this day Are you scientists not brilliant at abstract thought gifted beyond measure in unpicking complex behaviour from a mass of data yet totally incapable of connecting another human to that process You spend so much time living in your box in your world of abstraction that you lack the necessary experience in being human exposure to the humanities to make a genuine connection to other people Sacks demonstrates that if you allow the human to take centre stage pushing the science to a supporting character then communication and wonder will flowAbsolutely recommended A real must read

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Ients struggling to adapt to often bizarre worlds of neurological disorder Here are people who can no longer recognize everyday objects or those they love; who are stricken with violent tics or shout involunt. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales Oliver SacksThe Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales is a 1985 book by neurologist Oliver Sacks describing the case histories of some of his patients Sacks chose the title of the book from the case study of one of his patients which he names Dr P that has visual agnosia a neurological condition that leaves him unable to recognize even familiar faces and objects Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat became the basis of an opera of the same name by Michael Nyman which premiered in 1986عنوانها م‍ردی‌ ک‍ه‌ ه‍م‍س‍رش‌ را ب‍ا ک‍لاه‍ش‌ اش‍ت‍ب‍اه‍ی‌ م‍ی‌گ‍رف‍ت‌؛ بانوی بی بدن؛ مردی که زنش را با کلاه اشتباه می‌گرفت و ماجراهای بالینی دیگر؛ نویسنده اول‍ی‍ور س‍اک‍س‌؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش سال 1999 میلادیعنوان م‍ردی‌ ک‍ه‌ ه‍م‍س‍رش‌ را ب‍ا ک‍لاه‍ش‌ اش‍ت‍ب‍اه‍ی‌ م‍ی‌گ‍رف‍ت‌؛ نویسنده اول‍ی‍ور س‍اک‍س‌؛ مت‍رج‍م ج‍اه‍د ج‍ه‍ان‍ش‍اه‍ی‌؛ ب‍ا م‍ق‍دم‍ه ح‍س‍ن‌ ع‍ش‍ای‍ری‌؛ تهران، صدای معاصر، 1377؛ در 356ص؛ شابک ایکس 964649403؛ واژه نامه؛ موضوع لطیفه ها بیماریهای اعصاب از نویسندگان بریتانیایی سده 20معنوان بانوی بی بدن؛ نویسنده اولیور ساکس؛ مترجم سما قرایی؛ تهران، نشر قطره، 1390؛ در 366ص؛ شابک 9786001190070؛ چاپ دوم 1394، در 388ص؛ چاپ سوم 1395، در 350ص؛ چاپ چهارم 1397؛ در 348ص؛عنوان مردی که زنش را با کلاه اشتباه می‌گرفت و ماجراهای بالینی دیگر؛ نویسنده اولیور ساکس؛ مترجم ماندانا فرهادیان؛ تهران، فرهنگ نشر نو، چاپ دوم 1396؛ در 330ص؛ شابک 9786007439333؛ کتابنامه از ص 319، تا ص 328؛ مردی که زنش را با کلاه اشتباه می‌گرفت و ماجراهای بالینی دیگر، اثر عصب‌ شناسی به نام «اولیور ساکس» است که در سال 1985میلادی منتشر شد؛ کتاب شرحی از ماجرای برخی از بیماران «ساکس» است؛ نگارنده عنوان کتاب را براساس یکی از بیمارانش، به نام «دکتر پی»؛ که مبتلا به «آگنوزیای دیداری»، یک بیماری عصبی، که تشخیص چهره‌ ها، و اشیای آشنا را، ناممکن می‌کند، برگزیده است؛ این کتاب بیست و چهار داستان دارد، و در چهار بخش «از دست دادن‌ها، زیادی‌ها، جابجایی‌ها و دنیای ساده‌ ها» است، که هر یک به جنبه ی ویژه ای از عملکرد مغز مربوط استتاریخ بهنگام رسانی 01041399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا شربیانی

Oliver Sacks ä 5 review

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical TalesIf a man has lost a leg or an eye he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self himself he cannot know it because he is no longer there to know it Dr Oliver Sacks recounts the stories of pat. It's rare that I read non fiction It's just not my bagThat said this is one of the most fascinating books I've ever read I'm guessing I've brought it up hundreds of times in conversationIt's written by a neurologist who works with people who have stranger than usual brain issues And not only are the cases interesting but the way he writes about the people invovled is really lovely It's not clinical at all Not judgemental It's very loving I would say It's interesting to see someone who obviously knows a lot of hard line science write about these cases in terms that seem to me suited to someone who would be a philosopher or a spiritualistAmazing book Can't recommend it highly enough