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Friedrich Nietzsche ´ Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen mobi

read Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen kindle º Paperback ☆ Thus Spoke Zarathustra is a foundational work of Western literature and is widely considered to be Friedrich Nietzsche’s masterpiece It includes the German philosopher’s famous discussion of the phrase ‘God is deadEates his Will to Power theory and devotes pages to critiuing Christian thinking in particular Christianity’s definition of good and evil I have at all times written my writings with my whole heart and soul I do not know what purely intellectual problems are There is a great deal of Nietzsche that I agree with and hoards with which I vehemently do not I've been accumulating uotes of his for five years now uotes whose inherent lack of context made me like him than I do now I still love many of his phrases as much as I did before but if we ever met we would not like each other at allDespite that muddle I am grateful that I came across his words while I was younger and in the full throes of depression cynicism and a frighteningly homicidal brand of solipsism I didn't know the definition of that last word back then but I was in desperate need of something both horribly dismal and blindingly bright a joy that did not reuire avoidance of despair but looked it full in the face The often contextualized and paraphrased Nietzsche with atheism nihilism and yet fierce and glorious fervor for the future seemed perfect back then To some extent he's still perfect but only in bits and pieces The call for solitude and individualism is as refreshing as ever the atheism is still in line with my sensibilities and the breathtaking vaults and shuddering descents carried my heart along with them However While I did indeed run across his cry for the Superman even going so far as to take to heart his ' Man is something that shall be over come' I paid as much mind to his Superman as concerned my younger self's view of the world and the people in it as utterly worthless Not until this reading did I fully realize Nietzsche's meaning; being as interested in social justice and well female as I am there was little chance of me passing up all that elitism and classism? and condemnation of empathy and rapier dashes of virulent misogyny It's strange though Perhaps it is a sign of just how much time I spent mooning after Nietzsche back when I took him in small doses but I am especially conscious of the time period in which he wrote this His decrying of the mob echoes my own views regarding oppressive ideologies and I have to wonder how much of his rampant condemnation of popular mentality fell upon the people rather than the ideas they lived by As for his abysmal portrayal of women who knows what a healthy dose of feminism and exposure to such awesome thinkers as Simone de Beauvoir Hannah Arendt and so many others would have accomplished Probably gotten rid of his 'creator's pregnancy' conceit if you're going to slander Nietzsche back off from the ridiculously disproportionate appropriation please if nothing else Also there is the matter of his one serious attempt at heterosexual love having been rejected right around the time of composition of this piece It doesn't excuse him at all but it does explain his vitriol someAll of that above is wishful thinking of course but seeing as this is the enigmatic rhapsodizer on the subject of wishful thinking it's than merited For all of Nietzsche's aggravating inegalitarianism he captured the rapid fire oscillation between top of the world and descent into hell so perfectly so utterly and then crafted with it a raison d'être both deathly serious and blissfully rapturous There's no small amount of nihilism in his dismissal of everything solid everyone stationary everything decrepit and outdated and finally after long last proved false but there's a spitfire life to it that laughs at self serving pandering and loves chaotic progress that I myself cannot forbear from adoring and making my own 'This is now my way where is yours?' Thus I answered those who asked me 'the way' For the way does not exist I shall keep this in mind Nietzsche if nothing else Not all of what your Zarathustra spoke rings true to me but you are one of the few who favored freedom over advice For that I am in your debt I am of today and of the has been he said then; but there is something in me that is of tomorrow and of the day after tomorrow and of the shall be PS This particular edition was great I have no clue about the uality of the translation but the introduction and endnotes endnotes that included all those untranslateable bits with as much explanation as possible were indispensable

doc ↠ Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen ´ Friedrich Nietzsche

Thus Spoke Zarathustra is a foundational work of Western literature and is widely considered to be Friedrich Nietzsche’s masterpiece It i Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen Friedrich NietzscheThe book consists of four parts The first part appeared in 1883 the second and third in 1884 the fourth in 1885 as a private print In 1886 Nietzsche published the first three parts as “So Zarathustra spoke A book for everyone and no one In three parts” In contrast to Nietzsche's early works the Zarathustra is not a non fiction book In hymn prose a personal narrator reports on the work of a fictional thinker who bears the name of the Persian founder of religion Zarathustraتاریخ نخستین خوانش یکی از روزهای سال 1971 میلادیعنوان چنین گفت زرتشت کتابی برای همه کس و هیچکس؛ اثر فردریش نیچه؛ مترجم حمید نیرنوری؛ تهران، ابن سینا، چاپ دوم 1346؛ در 436ص؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، امیرکبیر، سیمرغ، چاپ سوم 1351؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، اهورا، 1384؛ در 597ص؛ شابک 9647316097؛ چاپهای بعدی اهورا، 1385؛ 1386؛ 1388؛ 1392؛ موضوع فلسفه فیلسوفان آلمانی سده 19معنوان چنین گفت زرتشت کتابی برای همه کس و هیچکس؛ اثر فردریش نیچه؛ مترجم داریوش آشوری؛ اسماعیل خویی؛ تهران، نیل، 1349؛ در یک جلد؛ چاپ دیگر 1352 در 488ص؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، نگاه، 1370، در 542ص؛ چاپ هشتم 1372؛ چاپ سی و پنجم 1393؛ عنوان چنین گفت زرتشت؛ مترجم مسعود انصاری؛ تهران، زرین، 1379؛ در 607ص؛ شابک 9789644074004؛ چاپ دیگر؛ تهران، جامی، 1377؛ در 384ص، چاپ دوم 1379؛ چاپ سوم 1380؛ چاپ پنجم 1382؛ چاپ هفتم 1385؛ چاپ هشتم و نهم 1386؛ در 378ص؛ شابک 9645620600؛ چاپ دهم 1388؛ دوازدهم 1391؛ سیزدهم 1393؛ مترجمهای دیگر مهرداد شاهین؛ نقل از متن ای انسان هشدار نیم شب ژرف چه میگوید؟خفته بودم، خفته بودم، از خواب ژرف برخاسته امجهان ژرف است، ژرفتر از آن که روز گمان کرده است رنج آن ژرف است، لذت، ژرفتر از محنت؛ رنج میگوید گم شو اما هر لذتی جاودانگی میخواهد، جاودانگی ژرف ژرف را ترجیع بند زرتشت پایان نقلا شربیانی

doc Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen

Also sprach Zarathustra Ein Buch für Alle und KeinenNcludes the German philosopher’s famous discussion of the phrase ‘God is dead’ as well as his concept of the Superman Nietzsche delin Verily have I overshot myself in my vanity into thinking that I was ready to attempt this book Humbled am I nowI probably got less than one third of what Nietzsche was fulminating on Maybe in another two reading or so maybe with a different translation ?Can anyone who has read this help me out? Is the second half of the book just plain abstruse or was it just me?