Free Under Nushagak Bluff kindle ´ eBook 9781597098090

mobi Under Nushagak Bluff

Free Under Nushagak Bluff kindle ´ eBook 9781597098090 Ö In 1939 everything changes for Anne Girl when outsider John Nelson grounds his sailboat on the shores into Anne Girl's skiff and into her life during a rare storm in the Alaskan fishing village of Nushagak When Anne Girl and her mother Marulia find their skiff flatteIng village of Nushagak When Anne Girl and her mother Marulia find their skiff flattened by John's boat Anne Girl decides she both hates and wants him Thus begins a generational saga I listened to novelist Mia Heavener read from her new book Under Nushagak Bluff on November 12 at the Writers Block in Anchorage Mia was worried that she’d bore her listeners if she read too long but listening to the first chapter made me hungry to hear I wasn’t the only person who felt that way; the books on hand sold out in just a few minutes after the reading Luckily I’d already captured a copy to read eagerly over the next two daysHere’s the description from the book’s back cover “In 1939 everything changes for Anne Girl when outsider John Nelson grounds his sailboat on the shores into Anne Girl’s skiff and into her life during a rare storm in the Alaskan fishing village of Nushagak When Anne Girl and her mother Marulia find their skiff flattened by John’s boat Anne Girl decides she both hates and wants him This begins a generational saga of strong stubborn Yup’ik women living in a village that has been divided between the new and the old the bluff side and the missionary side the cannery side and the subsistence side”I hope the book stirs commentary from readers and reviewers knowledgeable about its geographic and historical and cultural settings It is the kind of book that is not over for you on first reading first understandings The novel takes place from 1939 into the 1950s yet Heavener’s narrator never backs up to give an overview of those war years The backdrop for the story is the expansion of a commercial salmon fishery in Bristol Bay and a Nushagak cannery crowding out the lifestyle of people who fished to live Old stories old people are crowded until they lose their moorings in culture; bluff and bay and cannery and new houses are also shadowed by the ambiguous expanding activities of missionaries and the less ambiguous expansion of money Everything changes over the course of this story subsistence to paychecks sails to outboards Russian Orthodox crosses to Moravians bible classes and baked goods to the reluctant educational ministrations of the state Young daughters stumble painfully into sex and adulthood on the invasive phalanx of docks and strangers All the characters move in their own given blindness in relation to the others pushing explanation into the reader’s realm Heavener offers only scenes and conversations a view of the event at hand The narration is so close it blinds the reader too—making us live inside the story with the characters listening to their voicesThe generations of women Marulia Anne Girl Ellen Sara step forward one by one in the passage of time that is the movement of this novel Sara is still a baby as the book ends; her future only glimpsed in the inertia of past events and her mother’s words to Sara’s future self Of all the characters Ellen emerges most clearly to readers as Heavener shows us that her time closely resembles ours but even that recognition is accompanied by a realization that what we readers can’t know and what each character cannot know about the others—for example the contradictory elderinebriate Sweet Mary—is being eroded and lost The narrator is unflinching about these losses which only intensifies a reader’s longing to regain them There is no super adult sitting at the end of this story no super culture taking notes on another—in fact there is no closure Only the skiff stuck fast by its own propeller to the sandbar in the middle of the channel gives a kind of overview with Ellen’s voice in the skiff disembodied and supernatural in what it can remember what it can project That voice is with the reader in italics at the start of many chapters working against the chronological time of the narrative suggesting a timeless Yup’ik knowing that robs familiar assumptions By some distance into this novel the reader does not uestion the appearance of a mother as a raven a mother as a gull The meaning in that progression as in all the progressions of Under Nushagak Bluff must be precipitated from the accumulation of scenes Heavener never utters “cruelty” or “misunderstanding” or “disfunction” or “alcoholism”; nor does she identify “resilience” or in fact “love” Heavener works her readers very hard in this book and it is rewarding work

Mia C. Heavener ä Under Nushagak Bluff doc

Of strong stubborn Yup'ik women living in a village that has been divided between the new and the old the bluff side and the missionary side the cannery side and the subsistence sid Great This multi generational look at women's native village life in rural Alaska was fantastic It felt right on not a fast read but on village time The tensions of Christianmissionaries and traditionalshamanistic understanding of reality the reality of alcohol and exploitative outsiders in this case cannery and fisheries It was hard to get into just like a village and very intriguing and definitely hooked me

eBook ´ Under Nushagak Bluff ä Mia C. Heavener

Under Nushagak Bluff In 1939 everything changes for Anne Girl when outsider John Nelson grounds his sailboat on the shores into Anne Girl's skiff and into her life during a rare storm in the Alaskan fish I purchased this book directly from Red Hen Press while at the Miami Book Fair I wasn't sure if I would enjoy this novel but I was immediately drawn in by the author's rich description of both the characters and the environment This story traces the personal and emotional history of three really two generations of women growing up in a small fishing community in Alaska starting from just before WW to the decades following The narrative is driven by the push and pull of the seasons mirrored by the ups and downs of the female main characters It's not packed with action but there's something that kept me turning the pages to find out how the lives of these women strong difficult but ultimately sympathetic were going to evolve The author writes beautifully weaving the idea of the importance of stories and storytelling throughout the book I highly recommend this novel to anyone interested in a story driven by compelling characters andor someone who enjoys reading about the diverse history of Alaska