Download The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience Ebook á 458 pages

Book The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience

Download The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience Ebook á 458 pages È Frances Perkins is no longer a household name yet she was one of the most influential women of the twentieth Unemployed workers She breathed life back into the nation’s labor movement boosting living standards across the country As head of the Immigration Service she fought to bring European refugees to safety in the United States Her greatest triumph was creating Social Security Written with a wit that echoes Frances Perkins’s own award winning journalist Kirstin Downey gives us a riveting exploration of how and why Perkins slipped into historical oblivion and restores Perkins to her proper place in histor Completely fascinating America has no idea what it owes to Frances Perkins and it boggles my mind that someone who gave SO MUCH to modern society fire codes no child labor social security labor unions unemployment insurance fair work days SO MUCH MORE is completely unknown to most of us Perkins has always been one of my personal heroes but this book solidifies her place at the very top What an incredible brave wise clever devoted American we had in Frances Perkins Highly recommended

Kirstin Downey è The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience Book

Frances Perkins is no longer a household name yet she was one of the most influential women of the twentieth century Based on eight years of research extensive archival materials new documents and exclusive access to Perkins’s family members and friends this biography is the first complete portrait of a devoted public servant with a passionate personal life a mother who changed the landscape of American business and societyFrances Perkins was named Secretary of Labor by Franklin Roosevelt in 1933 As the What a team Frances Perkins 1880 1965 and Franklin D Roosevelt 1882 1945 made Perkins had the ideas and the ambition to accomplish her goals FDR had the political clout and knowledge to get the job doneFrances Perkins was the first female cabinet member in American history She was the Secretary of Labor She fought into law Section 7 of the National Industrial Recovery Act in 1933 What was the list she told FDR she wanted to accomplish or else she would not take the job? It was as follows End child labor a 40 hour work week minimum wages unemployment insurance Social Security workplace fire safety improved working conditions and universal or national health care She accomplished all but the health coverage FDR also involved her in areas other than labor such as immigration Perkins was the author of the New DealThe book is well written and meticulously researched I found the book fascinating It is primarily an academic portrayal of a great legislator and reformer The author follows Perkins from childhood to death and also touches on some of her ancestors I thoroughly enjoyed this book and could hardly put it down The information on the Roosevelts I knew but most of the information about Perkins was new to me Some people may not enjoy the academic tenor of the bookKristin Downey is a journalist She shared the 2000 Pulitzer Prize with her group at the Washington Post I enjoyed reading her 2014 biography “Isabella The Warrior ueen”I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible The book is almost twenty hours long Susan Ericksen does an excellent job narrating the book Ericksen is an actress and multi award winning audiobook narrator Over the years I have enjoyed listening to her read a wide range of books

Ebook Æ The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience è Kirstin Downey

The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral ConscienceFirst female cabinet secretary she spearheaded the fight to improve the lives of America’s working people while juggling her own complex family responsibilities Perkins’s ideas became the cornerstones of the most important social welfare and legislation in the nation’s history including unemployment compensation child labor laws and the forty hour work week Arriving in Washington at the height of the Great Depression Perkins pushed for massive public works projects that created millions of jobs for Frances Perkins born 1880 into an upper class but no longer well off Boston family and she used her connections and her gentility well An eye witness to the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire she took an early interest in the welfare of the working class and in the settlement house movement supporting nascent labor union activities in New York finding her strongest support from Tammany Hall She knew Franklin Roosevelt fleetingly as a young man but forged a working alliance during his governorship of New York and served as his well trusted secretary of labor throughout his presidential administration When Truman succeeded the other cabinet members declared that that they simply could not work with a female at the cabinet level Truman caved in and she continued in other lesser positions eventually teaching at Cornell until her death I am old enough to remember her name and given her strong influence and accomplishments in the labor movement in getting Social Security and other programs passed why isn't her name widely known today? She was much interested in what she could accomplish than in who got the credit She used her social connections to bring useful people together She sagely formed alliances with often neglected wives and mothers of politicians She studied how to manage her bosses how to approach them how to act as a go between for men who didn't want to commit themselves before knowing the other guy's reaction how to negotiate She dressed as if she were a generation older than her real age to look like a mother than a potential girlfriend She had the New England habit of not showing emotion and of keeping her private life private and sadly there were reasons she was supporting a husband who was in and out of mental asylums for severe bipolar disorder and lived to be old and a daughter similarly afflicted but functioning at a social level All this was in the days before mental health was discussed publicly and before health insurance; it drained her financially as well as emotionally and that's why she had to work into her 80's We don't learn from her own words how Frances felt We wind up admiring her not necessarily developing a liking for such a reticent person We'd probably like her if we knew her in person; she was liked and appreciated in her time by those who were not upset by a woman being in power