Summary What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era ´ eBook ePUB or Kindle PDF

review ñ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ô Peggy Noonan

What I Saw at the Revolution A Political Life in the Reagan EraS are rendered in inimitable witty prose Her priceless account of what it was like to be a speechwriter among bureaucrats and a woman in the last bastion of male power makes this a Washington memoir that breaks the mold as spirited sensitive and thoughtful as Peggy Noonan hersel. It's not my political cup of tea but Peggy Noonan writes an engaging memoir of her experiences working as a speechwriter for the Reagan administration I enjoyed her style and perspective even when I didn't agree with her My chief problem was that every time Reagan walks into a room she is just short of describing him as accompanied by rainbows and unicorns At the same time I understand that comes from being part of the Reagan Revolution A uniue perspective on working for a presidential administration and an interesting read even if it's not your political leanings

Free read What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era

Summary What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ô On the hundredth anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s birth comes the twentieth anniversary edition of Peggy Noonan’s critically acclaimed bestseller What I Saw at the Revolution foOn the hundredth anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s birth comes the twentieth anniversary edition of Peggy Noonan’s critically acclaimed bestseller What I Saw at the Revolution for which she provides a new Preface that demonstrates this book’s timeless relevance As a special a. This book written 23 years ago is filled with poise beyond its writer's years even when she is score settling and it makes you wonder what wisdom its author will uncover in the decades to come All these years later we can say uite a lot What I Saw at the Revolution is larger and autobiographical than the books Noonan has often written since It is denser in every way It is rewarding and enjoyable and at times a touch too heavy There are moments as well when a reader can feel Noonan clench her fist and punch the air triumphantly as she imagines what one of the witling editors of her president's speeches will think of seeing himself made infamous in print It's a writer's innocent conceit never to realize such witlings do not read about themselves or anything else Noonan comes closest to this realization here there's an odd thing about writing as an art The critical faculty often fails When people who can't paint try to paint they can usually step back when they're done smile a rueful smile and admit that painting's not their talent But when people who can't write try to write they often can't tell they're not good In fact they often think they're pretty close to wonderful and they're genuinely hurt and often suspicious when told otherwise p 77The book's most interesting pieces are those in which the wide eyed young presidential speechwriter discovers her hero the President of the United States of America is a bit of an empty vessel a professionally trained actor a pleaser of rooms He really always played himself; the vivid have no choice That's why he seemed both phony and authentic Because he was He was really acting but the part he played was Ronald Reagan p 158That observation has aged well It's a tribute to Noonan that the very pop pom shakers who today clip a sentence of hers here or there for their Republican rallies would regard that passage as such apostasy Lucky for them revelations like that happen far too deep in the pages of this considering book; they needn't ever be disabused of their love for her and HimBut Noonan would never be loyal as they wished her to be because she is a writer an employer of perfect words like tropism and not a publicist Or as she puts it A writer can do anything for his side but write for it You either take whatever talent you have and let it lead you where it leads you or you harness it to a political viewpoint and let political considerations decide what you do and do not write do and do not see In which case you are a partisan and a polemicist but not a writer You have to decide what you are p 324Noonan knows by the end of this book exactly what she is and she captures it in this tiny phrase my curiosity has grown bigger than my awe

Peggy Noonan Ô 8 Download

Ssistant to the president Noonan worked with Ronald Reagan and with Vice President George H W Bush on some of their most memorable speeches Noonan shows us the world behind the words and her sharp vivid portraits of President Reagan and a host of Washington’s movers and shaker. After visiting the Reagan Library I seem to be obsessed with all books Reagan Especially written by Noonan and a review would be redundant I'll leave it at this it's not as good as When Character was King but it made me love Noonan even