The Debt to Pleasure Read & Download É PDF DOC TXT or eBook

Summary The Debt to Pleasure

The Debt to Pleasure Read & Download É PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ï With an introduction by John Banville Winner of the Whitbread First Novel Award 1996 To like something is to want to ingest it and in that sense is to submit to the world; to like something is to succumb in a small but contentful way to death Taruin Winot hA far sinister mission slowly reveals itselfWinner of the 1996 Whitbread First Novel Award John Lanchester's The Debt to Pleasure is a wickedly funny ode to food; an erotic and sensual culinary journey Its elegant intelligent and unhinged narrator is nothing less than a work of art himsel. I read about this book on the web as I was googling Iain Pears; what a lucky coincidence This is an incrediby original and engrossing book; a monologue by one of the most colorful eccentric and deranged fictional characters I have come across in a very long time The narrator is a food critic and incidentally a madman with an irresistible sense of humor uite a combination He peppers his life narrative with some interesting recipes and menus Of course as he gets caught up in his story the truth becomes clearer a very chilling truth at that

Read ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Î John Lanchester

D snob travels a circuitous route from the Hotel Splendide in Portsmouth to his cottage in Provence Along the way he tells the story of his childhood and beyond through a series of delectable menus organized by season But this is no ordinary cookbook and as we are drawn into Taruin's world. Taruin Winot the snobby Francophile who narrates John Lanchester’s debut novel has a voice reminiscent of Oliver in Julian Barnes’s Talking It Over and Love etc His opinionated verbose speech provides much of the book’s wit “This is not a conventional cookbook” the first line warns but a foodie’s tribute to the traditional English and French dishes that compose the best seasonal menus For winter he suggests blinis with sour cream and caviar Irish stew and ueen of Puddings Spring prompts variations on the theme of lamb “lamb and apricots are one of those combinations which exist together in a relation that is not just complementary but that seems to partake of a higher order of inevitability – a taste which exists in the mind of God” he rhapsodizes And yes he includes recipesBut as we travel with Taruin from Portsmouth to Provence we begin to learn about this peculiar character through the memories the dishes elicit about his Irish nanny his sculptor brother’s boarding school years and so on Lanchester very subtly introduces notes of doubt about the narrator’s reliability until we have to wonder how much his tale resembles Patrick Süskind’s Perfume or Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr Ripley I might have preferred an epilogue that gets outside Taruin’s head and gives some objective facts but that’s a minor uibble about an otherwise deliciously clever sinuous novel

John Lanchester Î 4 Summary

The Debt to PleasureWith an introduction by John Banville Winner of the Whitbread First Novel Award 1996 To like something is to want to ingest it and in that sense is to submit to the world; to like something is to succumb in a small but contentful way to death Taruin Winot hedonist food obsessive ironist an. uirky and inventive novel which is well worth the effort of persisting with the pompous and irritating narrator Taruin Winot is a foodie and is not all that he seems The blurb on the back of the book indicates that Also anyone who changes hia name from Rodney to Taruin does have identity problems It is a sort of Mrs Beeton meets American Psycho The food talk is actually very interesting and Lanchester clearly knows his stuff he ought to as he has been a restaurant critic for the Observer The recipes sound delicious and seductive; the ragu Irish Stew and ratatouille stand out Taruin is a marvellous literary creation and Lanchaester has his snobbery just right He compares the English penchant for having mint sauce with Lamb to their penchant for flagellation and cryptic crosswords; not a juxtaposition that had ever occured to me beforeIs Taruin and unreliable narrator I think it may be subtle than that; he is a seductive narrator He builds the layers gradually; an aesthete but he draws in rather than misleads It is clear from early on that our narrator is seriously disturbed and you can see the ending from some distance There is a facination wondering if you know what he is really up to and how he's going to achieve his goal Note to Mr Easton Ellis; less is and works better This is a clever study of the seriously deranged surrounded by lush descriptions of the French countryside and its cuisine The novel flows easily and is very well written It is original and interesting