Doc  Morocco That Was ´ 246 pages

Doc Morocco That Was

Doc  Morocco That Was ´ 246 pages õ Here are the vanished days of the unfettered Sultanate in all their dark melodramatic splendor a mingling of magnificence with sualor culture with barbarism refined cruelty with nave humor Until 1912 Morocco never suffered foreign domination and its mountainous interior was as closed to foreigners Here are the vanished days of the unfettered Sultanate in all their dark melodramatic splendor a mingling of magnificence with sualor culture with barbarism refined cruelty with nave humor Until 1912 Morocco never suffered foreign domination and its mountainous interior was as closed to foreigners as T You will find first hand accounts in many settings from Europe to Asia and South America but you'll find very few about life and events in North Africa A truly fascinating read about life in Morocco outside Tangier and often close to the sultans of the time Clearly many passages of the book are an exaggeration or dramatisation of events sometimes bordering of the ludicrous often overstating the role of the author but this hardly changes the intriguing setting and time period against which it is set The story of brigands and tribes an inhospitable environment for many a stranger being a westerner or city dweller of Morocco's main towns might easily go unknown The story on approaching Chefchaouen and the impossibility of Christians to get in is eually riveting despite the author's escape appearing rather far fetched Don't read this book for a fact finding account of Morocco in the late 1800s read it for getting a grasp of life in a bygone era So close to Europe yet so distant At providing such an insight Walter Harris does a stellar job

Doc ´ Morocco That Was ☆ Walter Burton Harris

Even of befriending his kidnapper It was said that only three Christians had ever visited the walled city of Chechaouen one was poisoned one came for an hour disguised as a rabbi and the other was Harris Originally published in 1921 Morocco That Was is alternately sharp melodramatic and extremely funn A great read during Moroccan vacation Written in a lively and exciting way a first person account of Morocco just before the French protectorate While as the last chapter says not 100% factual and partially embellished still an amazing read from The Times correspondent and adventurer living in Tanger in those colorful and turbulent times One caveat is a very European centric perspective on the politics of colonialism but if you put it aside a fascinating read like a novel that a factual relation

Walter Burton Harris ☆ Morocco That Was Text

Morocco That WasIbet Walter Harris 1866 1933 though was the exception He first visited in 1887 and lived in the country for than thirty five years and as the Times correspondent had observed every aspect of its life He was an intimate of at least three of the ruling Sultans as well as King Edward VII and a man capable I had no particular interest in Morocco but this looked interesting and so it was The author was the Times correspondent to the country in the late 19th and early 20th century so this is an eyewitness account of the last years of its independenceHe knew several successive Sultans personally and in the first half of the book he describes the court and its workings and dysfunctions He says that the system of government was unchanged for hundreds of years I could well believe it Despite the differences of culture and geography I noticed a number of interesting parallels between the Sultanate and the Medieval English kingsIn the second half of the book he moves to a number of different subjects and stories Perhaps most interesting is his account of the time he spent as a hostage What he has to say about Morocco often reveals a country dark and disturbing but always interesting And he’s a dab hand at telling an amusing storyThe Eland edition is a nice one The usual well made paperback with good paper There’s a good photograph of the author looking incredibly camp in a sexy black off the shoulder number Also a very good afterword that discusses how much of the book is true Apparently Harris was known at school as the Liar