The Tenure of Kings And Magistrates Ebook Ý 48 pages ¸ Moneyexpresscard

Book The Tenure of Kings And Magistrates

The Tenure of Kings And Magistrates Ebook Ý 48 pages ¸ Moneyexpresscard ☆ This scarce antiuarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age it may contain imperfections such as marks notations marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important we have R protecting preserving and promoting the world's literature in affordable high uality modern editions that are true to the original wo Who knows not that the King is a name of dignity and office not of person Who¬†therfore kills a King must kill him while he is a King

John Milton ¹ The Tenure of Kings And Magistrates Ebook

This scarce antiuarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age it may contain imperfections such as marks notations There can be slainNo sacrifice to God acceptable Than an unjust and wicked KingThese words attributed by Milton to Seneca's Hercules are key to his arguments here in The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates John Milton's famous defense of regicide As in other works he relies heavily on Scripture and Greek and Roman history as evident from the uote above particularly drawing on Aristotle's Politics for support of his thesis The work was published only a couple of weeks after the execution of King Charles I and was mainly intended to reconcile men's minds rather than to determine anything about Charles often taking aim at the Presbyterians who publicly condemned the regicide after initially voting in favor of it the argument being presented by its author as follows THAT IT IS LAWFUL AND HATH BEEN HELD SO THROUGH ALL AGES FOR ANY WHO HAVE THE POWER TO CALL TO ACCOUNT A TYRANT OR WICKED KING AND AFTER DUE CONVICTION TO DEPOSE AND PUT HIM TO DEATH IF THE ORDINARY MAGISTRATE HAVE NEGLECTED OR DENIED TO DO IT AND THAT THEY WHO OF LATE SO MUCH BLAME DEPOSING ARE THE MEN THAT DID IT THEMSELVES The Presbyterians are then mentioned specifically by name several times throughout as the author's argument unfolds not always in the kindliest of terms As his argument develops Milton shows that to protect one another from violence and destruction men prior to this all free and eual organized societies and appointed leaders to ensure that mutually agreed upon laws and social justice were carried out fairly and eually But of course the temptation of such a power left absolute in the leaders' hands perverted them at length to injustice and partiality And being that these contracts are freely entered into they may also be freely broken when it is felt they are violated not very dissimilar from points Rousseau would make a century later If I make a voluntary covenant with a man to do him good and he prove afterward a monster to me I should conceive a disobligement And if necessary a man may defend himself even against the king in person by any means including of course regicide Is it any wonder given the views presented here that Milton gave us a sympathetic Satan in Paradise Lost a Satan who felt he was justified to rebel against his King?

Doc É The Tenure of Kings And Magistrates ¹ John Milton

The Tenure of Kings And MagistratesMarginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important we have made it available as part of our commitment fo This is a monumental work for what it represents Indeed there is no uestion that the premise it sets forth is a lot important than the specific words used here However that's where my problems with this work come forth the philosophy behind the arguments used follows the precept that the victor must be right Indeed Mr Milton himself claims that the very same arguments that he uses throughout can be used to convince anyone of the opposite to his work and his only dismissal of that is that this would be a stupid thing to do Regrettably that's an approach that is fraught with danger as anyone can re write the truth as it fits the present day which can obviously happenHence my overall assessment of this work is lessened as it is not a resounding moral thesis but a justification of the cruelties of man As this event has been put into song Let him curse my name but remember the truth