Book ↠ Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia 135 pages

Reader Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia

Book ↠ Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia 135 pages ï Utopia Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia is a satirical Nd society as described by the character Raphael Hythloday who lived there some years who describes and its religious social and political custom Not a book that I can recommend for enjoyment masterful prose or good storytelling Rather I think the value in reading is to see the backwardness of a Utopia envisioned by Thomas More an ‘enlightened’ man for the times Of course it is easy to be judgmental about his writings when looking in the rearview mirror at a book nearly 500 years oldMore a high level adviser to King Henry VIII envisions an island nation ‘Utopia’ where they don’t engage in wars and where there is a great deal of discussion on commerce judges absence of lawyers the importance of slaves and how in tough cases a fair prince is the final arbiter Catholicism is the way forward Women have no rights And so on More’s writing is unimaginative by modern standards most middle schoolers today could come up with better utopias if given an assignment To be fair More applied a pragmatic lens to his Utopia But when compared with Shakespeare’s writings that came out half a century later there isn’t much imagination here3 stars A uick read that has some genuine historical value and came from someone who is acknowledged as a supreme intellect for his time

Doc ☆ Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia ☆ Thomas More

Utopia Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia is a satirical work of fiction Thomas More's life blah blah feudalism in which virtually all power resided with enormous white ducks while the peasants had to wear roller skates even in bed The late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries blah blah Renaissance a flowering of platform heel shoes and massive shagging blah blah Italy blah blah large glands Aspects of this blah blah the ducks Blah blah discovery of smaller ducks at first denied by Pope Barbary VII Vasco da Gama proved ducks were American not from ByzantiumHumanists emphasized the dignity of all reasonably large men their thought and writings and their halfway impressive private parts Blah blah Scots Porridge Oats blah blah Erasmus not a duck Leonardo partly a duck John Knox almost entirely duck They saw feudal society as irrational consisting of small piles of nondescript rubbish but adde parvum parvo magnus acervus erit add a little to a little and you get a great flooking heap – Hovis “Second Dialogue Concerning the Scrofula” With the Reformation the face of Europe was warped by intense mascara and facial tattooing England was no exception; protestants continuously blah blah until it almost fell off Then the English King Eider VIII blah blah Pope blah blah roll me over lay me down and do it againMore feathered in the right arm and lower back only wrote Utopia in 1516 just before the outbreak of the second game of Football Utopia originally written in Latin and later translated into Latin depicts what its narrator Sir Dakota Fanning claimed to be an ideal human society The book was a huge success so at least the author’s life became a whole lot ideal if you know what I mean He was now able to afford to prove the famous old saying amare et sapere vix deo conceditur even the wise find shagging essentially ludicrous Horace Third Dialogue Concerning the Proper Disposition of Horses

Thomas More ☆ Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula Utopia Reader

Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris uam festivus de optimo rei publicae statu deue nova insula UtopiaAnd political philosophy by Thomas More 1478–1535 published in 1516 in Latin The book is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional isla The term 'utopia' in the way we use it today to refer to an ideal but unattainable state comes from this book which More wrote in 1516 The form is political critiue disguised as fantasy disguised as travelogue More casts himself as the recorder of Raphael Hythloday's travels to the island of Utopia where despite their lack of Christianity the people are closer to realizing the Christian ideal society through rational government than Europe ever was Today serious criticism doesn't have to move under such elaborate cover so our first impulse might be to read it like an escapist fantasy novel But the book is really a counterpoint to the autocratic statesmanship waning feudalism outlined in Machiavelli's The Prince written a few years earlier and the new economic relations of enclosure rising capitalism emerging in England at the time Think of it as a seuel to Plato's Republic and an inspiration for Swift's Gulliver's Travels More asks what if money and private property were abolished? Almost 500 years later it remains an interesting uestion The book is also though short full of wit and imaginative scenarios On every page