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kindle Ð A Wizard of Earthsea 183 pages Download Å moneyexpresscard à Ged the greatest sorcerer in all Earthsea was called Sparrowhawk in his reckless youth Hungry for power and knowledge Sparrowhawk tampered with long held secrets and loosed a terrible shadow upon the world This is the tale of his tesSparrowhawk tampered with long held secrets and loosed a terrible shadow upon the world This is the tale of his testin Do you ever re read books that your long ago self loved? Do they stand up to time?This one definitely does I know it doesn't need another five star review from anyone but if you are looking for a book to introduce a youngster to fantast this is an excellent one It has stood the test of time very well The language is lovely the challenges our young magic user must meet are solid ones and while it hints of adventures to come it stands very well on its ownRecommended

A Wizard of EarthseaSparrowhawk tampered with long held secrets and loosed a terrible shadow upon the world This is the tale of his testin Do you ever re read books that your long ago self loved? Do they stand up to time?This one definitely does I know it doesn't need another five star review from anyone but if you are looking for a book to introduce a youngster to fantast this is an excellent one It has stood the test of time very well The language is lovely the challenges our young magic user must meet are solid ones and while it hints of adventures to come it stands very well on its ownRecommended

book ☆ A Wizard of Earthsea Å Ursula K. Le Guin

A Wizard of Earthsea ↠ Ged the greatest sorcerer in all Earthsea was called Sparrowhawk in his reckless youth Hungry for power and knowledge ”The hunger of a dragon is slow to wake but hard to sate” The Folio Society edition is superbly illustrated by David LuptonThe boy is born on the island of Gont in the archipelago of Earthsea This is a world infused with magic Not everyone can control this magic but those who know the right words and have a wizard soul can learn to utilize the power of the Earth to manipulate objects and events The boy’s name is Duny; I can tell you that name because the name has no power over him His true name is something he can only reveal to those he trusts absolutely beyond uestionI know his true name but fair reader I’m not sure yet that I can share it with you His aunt knows a few things a handful of words that can be used to bind things or call animals to her Duny is particularly adept at calling falcons and other birds of prey His agile mind soon surpasses what his aunt can teach him He burns to know He is assigned to a mage Ogion who tries to teach him about the balance of magic with the Earth There is always a cost for using magic Understanding the levy for sorcery is the difference between being just impulsively talented and being wise about what you know ”You must not change one thing one pebble one grain of sand until you know what good and evil will follow on that act The world is in balance in Euilibrium A wizard’s power of Changing and of Summoning can shake the balance of the world It is dangerous that power It is most perilous It must follow knowledge and serve need To light a candle is to cast a shadow”If the flap of a butterfly wing in the can cause a hurricane in Florida imagine what a wizard can do with power over the weather It is kind of funny but there is this one scene where wizards on different islands use spells to keep the clouds from raining on them This storm bounces between them like a boiling stew pot Now a wizard like Ogion finds shelter under a tree and waits for the rain to stop To Sparrowhawk this type of restraint is ridiculous If you have the power why not use it? Duny is Sparrowhawk and you might think that is his real name but just because you’ve read a few paragraphs of this review doesn’t mean you’ve endeared yourself to me enough to tell you his real name Sparrowhawk will suffice for now Sparrowhawk becomes impatient with the restrained magic that Ogion teaches so he is sent to magic school on the Island of Roke There was a magic school in literature before Hogwarts? Indeed there was The first time he goes to the dining hall to eat there is only one table The table in a very Hogwarts’ fashion expands to fit as many people who enter to eat Sparrowhawk is soon recognized as one of the most gifted students Spells and the names of things flow into his mind like lava changing the landscape of his brain into something completely different He becomes powerfulHe becomes arrogantHe becomes vengeful on those who don’t appreciate his power In a moment of hubris he summons a dead woman from the distant past and in the process opens a rift that nearly kills him It does kill the old mage who helps him close it Something came through Sparrowhawk is burned in mind body and spirit He is guilty of a death The shame and self condemnation weigh heavily on him He may become the great wizard he was intended to be but the road will be much longer now The shadow from another world that pursues him becomes the devil on his heels for the rest of the novel This chase from island to island reminded me of Frankenstein and his pursuit of his monster to the North Pole The interesting thing about this novel is that Ursula K Le Guin’s publisher came to her and asked her to write a book for older kids Young Adult wasn’t even a term yet in the late 1960s She wasn’t sure she wanted to write such a book but she was nagged by the idea of where do great wizards come from? We normally meet them when they are old sages in the vein of a Merlin or a Gandalf She wanted G erhhh Sparrowhawk to be seen as human fallible than how most wizards had been presented before I liked the emphasis she puts on the importance of words in this novel and the power and magic that resides in knowing the names of things I had trepidations about reading this book I was reassured that I was in the capable hands of a writer I’ve enjoyed before I have a bit of a knee jerk reaction to the term Young Adult because I’m not a Young Adult I’m an old fuddy duddy who has a hard time watching commercials on TV geared towards youth I certainly wince at the idea of spending hours trapped in a book intended for a younger audience I’m somewhat alarmed at the number of ADULTS who read nothing but Young Adult The evolution of a reader is for that person to move from picture books then ride the escalator to Young Adult and eventually find the elevator that will take them onwards and upwards to adult literature I’m still pondering this Is it an extended childhood? Why would someone always want to read about children or teenagers? Am I generationally challenged on this issue? I am happy that people are reading and ultimately it is better that they read anything rather than nothing at all but I do think that the you read there should be some evolution in what you choose to read I’m such an eclectic reader that it is difficult for me to understood people being so genre specific with their reading choices Young Adult now dominates the publishing world Writers are being encouraged to make changes to their novels so they can be marketed as YA If I weren’t worried about this trend it would be fascinating There are dragon battles alluring women who try to seduce Gd to their own uses There are friendships made and lost; there are painful realizations and there is growth and acceptance of our own limitations Most importantly there is a wizard as wise and as powerful as Gandolf or Merlin who emerges like a Phoenix from the flames of his own childish conceit His name is Ged but you must only whisper it or better yet refer to him as Sparrowhawk and keep in the locked box at the center of your heart who he really is ”He hunted he followed and fear ran before him”If you wish to see of my most recent book and movie reviews visit also have a Facebook blogger page at book ☆ A Wizard of Earthsea Å Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin Å A Wizard of Earthsea reader

Ursula K. Le Guin Å A Wizard of Earthsea reader G how he mastered the mighty words of power tamed an ancient dragon and crossed death's threshold to restore the balan As a reader of Fantasy this book felt like a return home even though I had never read it before The tale of this young wizard and his hardships and coming to terms with his own darkness is one that has been redone again and again from Rowling to Jordan to Goodkind and so far despite adding gobs of length and endless details no one has managed to improve upon itThough she isn't the first to explore the Bildungsroman as Fantasy Mervyn Peake precedes her he was an author who eschewed symbolic magic and so has been duly ignored by most authors and readers in the genre Le Guin's approach is much familiar able comfortably to abide alongside Moorcock Tolkien and CS LewisYet her work has none of the condescension or moralizing that mark the last two nor the wild pulp sentiment of the first Her world unfolds before us calmly and confidently as we might expect from the daughter of noted anthropologistsAs is often the case in her work we get poignant asides on human nature but overall her depiction here is less novel than in for example the Hainish cycle There is something flat in the plot progression and as has been the case with every Le Guin book I have read I found myself longing for her to take things a little further to expand and do something risky Often she seems just on the cusp but rarely takes the stepPart of the flatness is the depiction of the characters who fall victim to the 'show don't tell' problem Again and again we are told of conversations characters had of how they reacted of whether they were clever or unsettling but we never actually see these conversations take place Many times the conversations would not have taken any longer to read than the descriptions of them so why Le Guin chose to leave so much of her story as an outline of action is puzzling and disappointingFundamentally what characters do is not interesting What they do does not differentiate them What is most important is how they do it their emotional response their choice of words the little pauses and moments of doubt At the end of the day the four musketeers are all men in the same uniform with mustaches dueling and warring and seducing women but they each go about these things in such distinct ways that we could never mistake one for the otherThe import of personality is also shown in Greek tragedy where we know what is going to befall the character the plot but we have no idea how they will react when it happens All the tension lies within the character's response not with the various external events that inspire itSo I found it very frustrating that again and again Le Guin didn't let the characters do their own talking and so I often felt estranged from them that I didn't know them or understand their motivations or interrelationships because the fundamental signs were missing As we near the end of the story and is revealed in conversation and interaction but that's the reverse of the ideal once you have established a character we can take some of their actions for granted but it's important in the beginning to let their idiosyncrasies reveal themAs others have pointed out Le Guin covers a lot of ground in a short span and perhaps it was a desire to make things brief and straightforward that caused her to take the words from her characters' mouths but again it seems backwards to me I would rather see a story shortened by taking out specifics and leaving promising implications instead of the other way around A single well written action or turn of phrase can reveal about a character than paragraphs of narrationIn her influential essay on fantasy From Elfland to Poughkeepsie she talks about how Dunsany does not really use dialogue the way other authors do that indeed she finds it difficult to locate any sustained conversations in The King of Elfland's Daughter Perhaps on some level she was trying to imitate his style But while it works brilliantly for him it does not serve her as wellThe main reason for this is that Le Guin is much a modern psychological realist author than Dunsany Her fantasy setting is sensible physical it feels like a different place a world like our world Her characters are inhabitants of that world the product of its cultures and history So when she removes their discourse and means of expression she closes the reader's window onto the character's inner lifeDunsany on the author hand takes a different approach his worlds are dreamlike the worlds of fairy tale His story takes place in the clash between the possible and the impossible the real and the dream His characters are not self contained psychological portraits of individuals but symbols appendages of the dreamland he weaves So it makes sense that they do not express themselves through the dialogue of psychoanalysis but through the instinctual pre knowledge of the dreamerIndeed Le Guin herself in that same essay talks about the danger of imitating Dunsany's style that it is so uniue and his pen a master's so that any attempt to recreate what we has done is bound to end in embarrassing failure Yet she also remarks it's a stage most fantasists seem to go through attempting to produce that sort of natural lovely false archaism She managed to leave that behind but now I wonder whether she didn't simply end up imitating another of Dunsany's stylistic modes without realizing it one just as problematic to a thoroughly modern anthropological writerWhat is most interesting about her story is how small and personal the central conflict is Many authors in fantasy have tried to tackle the conflict of the 'Shadow Self' from Tolkien's Gollum to the twin alter egos of Anderson's The Broken Sword but none have used it as a representation of the internal conflict of the adolescent which must be overcome in order to transition to adulthoodBy so perfectly aligning the symbolic magical conflict in her story with the central theme Le Guin creates a rare example of narrative unity in fantasy Most authors would have made it a subplot of the grand overblown good vs evil story and thus buried its importance beneath a massive conflict that is symbolic only of the fact that books have climaxes Once again I am struck with the notion that modern authors of fantasy epics have added nothing to the genre but details and lengthIf only Le Guin had given her lovely little story the strong characters and interrelationships it deserved it would have been truly transformative As it is it is sweet and thoughtful and sometimes haunting the scenes of stranding on the little island had a particularly unearthly tone and it lays out an intriguing picture of a young Merlin but in the end it felt like an incomplete visionMy List of Suggested Fantasy Books