REVIEW Ï George Washingtons Birthday

FREE READ George Washingtons Birthday

REVIEW Ï George Washingtons Birthday ½ From award winning author Margaret McNamara and New Yorker artist Barry Blitt comes this partly true and completely funny story of George Washington's 7th birthday In this clever approach to history readers will discover the truths and myths about George Washington Did George Washington wear a wig No Did GS young and old who are used to seeing George Washington as an old man will get a new look at the first president as a kid Perfect for classrooms Presidents' Day or as a birthday gift. I like to have strong feelings about a book either positive or negative when I review that book George Washington's Birthday has been on my shelf for several months I read it when I first received it and thought “meh” Today I set out to write a review of the book I’m still having the “meh” reaction The book is about George Washington's seventh birthday No one in his family seems to know or care that it's his birthday That's the plot for “Sixteen Candles” the 1984 John Hughes film It doesn't uite fit with a biography of the child who became one of the most skilled leaders in US history Perhaps Margaret McNamara wanted kids to be able to see themselves in Washington and so she played up Washington's fear that his birthday had been forgotten assuming this is a near universal fear among children First there’s no indication that Washington actually thought his family would forget his birthday Second the logical extension of McNamara’s approach is that if you are afraid your family has forgotten your birthday you too could grow up to be president of the United States The premise doesn't holdMany of the pages have glimpses of Washington's future life as well as future myths about Washington's childhood Margaret McNamara cleverly uses small boxes to separate fact from myth Of course there’s the myth of Washington chopping down a cherry tree There's also the myth of Washington throwing a rock across the Rappahannock River Both of these myths are accompanied by a small “myth” box identifying the stories as untrue The seven year old boy is interested in the weather outside and a small box labeled “fact” explains that Washington was always interested in the weatherGeorge Washington was a powerful figure in US history He was a strong and charismatic general a skilled politician and the first president of the United States In this book he is a cute little boy who is afraid everyone has forgotten his birthday I'd be excited about the book if by reading it I got a sense of Washington's greatnessThe wonderfully whimsical illustrations are the only part of the book that moved me from “meh” to “wow” The illustrations are humorous They add a sweetness to the book and they bring the little boy to life It's worth reading the book just to see the illustrations

Margaret McNamara ´ 1 REVIEW

Oach to history readers will discover the truths and myths about George Washington Did George Washington wear a wig No Did George Washington cut down a cherry tree Probably not Reader. I found it interesting that George Washington's Birthday was actually on February 11th instead of February 22nd The colonies were still under the Julian Calendar but in 1752 the Pope Gregory's Gregorian calendar was adopted by Europe and all of Europe's colony systems including the colonies in North America The new calendar was 1 year and 11 days earlier

SUMMARY õ MONEYEXPRESSCARD.CO.UK ´ Margaret McNamara

George Washingtons BirthdayFrom award winning author Margaret McNamara and New Yorker artist Barry Blitt comes this partly true and completely funny story of George Washington's 7th birthday In this clever appr. A delightful mixture of historical fiction and historical fact George Washington's Birthday imagines the activities of its eponymous hero on his seventh birthday Although the events chronicled are fictitious George's conversations with his parents and his half brother Augustine his chopping down of the cherry tree each two page spread contains the factual information behind the fictional imagining of that day In the scene in which young George begins to write a list of approved behaviors for instance the accompanying information reveals that by the time he was sixteen the real Washington had written 110 Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior that he kept on him at all times as a reminder The final page of the book presents a letter from Washington with further historical background on the subjectAs someone who read and greatly enjoyed Ron Chernow's magisterial adult biography Washington A Life I was curious to see how author Margaret McNamara would handle her partly fictional partly factual narrative I was uite pleased in the end and think that young readers will come away not just with a better knowledge about George Washington but a better understanding of the idea that history is a story one that is just as influenced by myth as by fact I was particularly pleased to see that the author mentions in her afterword George's letter that the myth of the cherry tree was promulgated by Parson Weems in his early 19th century pamphlet on Washington as we had to study this hagiographic work in a college course I took on American culture during that century The accompanying artwork here done by Barry Blitt in watercolor is humorous and appealing All in all a wonderful picture book one I would recommend to those looking to introduce young children to the subject of George Washington Perhaps it could be read on President's Day which as I'm sure every citizen knows is indeed George Washington's birthday