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doc ↠ Pokolbéli víg napjaim ´ György Faludy

doc ↠ Pokolbéli víg napjaim ´ György Faludy Ludy journeys to Paris where he finds a lover but merely a cursory asylum When the French capitulate to the Nazis Faludy travels to North Africa then on to America where he volunteers for military A 20th century life liberal classically educated Faludy got out of Horthy's Hungary in 1938 He spent time amongst the exiles in Paris was caught up in the chaotic exodus during the Fall of France and managed to make it to Casablanca Then there was an interlude in the US during which he joined the Army but wasn't sent to any battlefields Finally he returned to the post war ruins ended up caught up in the purges and was sent to a forced labour camp It ends with the prisoners getting released after the death of Stalin the fall of Rakosi and the 1956 revolution aren't includedFaludy doesn't pretend to be an angel or a hero and the way he treats the women in his life is not appealing But we get lots of close ups of communists before and after they get consumed by their own system The author is fully aware that he is living what are already topics in 20th century literature The Magic Mountain is cited in the Paris years and he has already read Koestler and Orwell by the time he is arrested It turns out that anti totalitarian novels don't prevent the rise of totalitarianism

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read Pokolbéli víg napjaim doc ¿ Paperback º My Happy Days in Hell 1962 is Gyorgy Faludy's grimly beautiful autobiography of his battle to survive tyranny and oppression Fleeing Hungary in 1938 as the German army approaches acclaimed poet Faludy journeys to Paris where he finds a lover but merely a cursory asylum When the French cap Service Missing his homeland and determined to do the right thing he returns – only to be imprisoned tortured and slowly starved eventually becoming one of only twenty one survivors of his camp uite difficult to write something There is the one hand and there is the other Obviously it deserves the five star rating and yetThe fifth chapter called 'The Forced Labour Camp' is some of the most inspiring writing one might read about the basic urgent human ability to face the most violent abuses and transcend this scenario with a fundamental and desperate application of the strength of the intellect I have read nothing like it to know of the deprivations the pain and suffering to have been a human being to survive through it allYet it may be difficult for anyone who does not have a strong affinity for Hungarian history to appreciate this novel It is the autobiography of a Hungarian poet who was interned in a work camp There is a great degree of politics and history all of it Hungarian As I read the novel the names of the people the villages all of them were uite familiar to me even the attitudes of the people were well known but only because I had lived there For me it was a 5 star book but it was because I was well familiar with Faludy György and what had happened in Hungary after the second world war I think it might be uite a difficult read for anyone not of Hungarian background but it is a great book and Faludy György has given us a wonderful gift at the cost of so much of his life

György Faludy ´ Pokolbéli víg napjaim text

Pokolbéli víg napjaimMy Happy Days in Hell 1962 is Gyorgy Faludy's grimly beautiful autobiography of his battle to survive tyranny and oppression Fleeing Hungary in 1938 as the German army approaches acclaimed poet Fa I have to confess I had only bought as it was one of the ten books in Penguin's Central European Classics series and I have become a dreadful completeist and had been putting off reading on account of its small print relative length and subject matter the memoirs of a Hungarian poet of the mid 20th Century doesn't particulary grab me or many others I would have thought but it's absolutely magnificent stuff highly recommended to anyone with an interest in the regimes of communist post war Europe The book begins in with the author's flight from Hungary ahead of it falling under Nazi rule to France North Africa and the USA before returning home to a country under communist control after the war and it is this period that the bulk of the book coversSome of the anecdotes regarding the detention and interrogation of alleged enemies of the state defy belief with their cruelty and stupidity An example is a vet arrested and tortured over the course of three weeks Then a Colonel in the secret police advised that unfortunately there had been a case of mistaken identity and the real suspect was another man with the same name But in his condition they were unable to simply release him So he was sent to a forced labour campMoments like the above stand out and over the course of several consecutive pages a dozen or so similar stories are reeled out but what I think will stay with me is the author's dignity and resilience and humour through these years