read epub ¶ Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book Paperback Þ gerard jones

reader ↠ Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book ↠ Gerard Jones

Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic BookAnimated by the stories of some of the last century's most charismatic and conniving artists writers and businessmen Men of Tomorrow brilliantly demonstrates how the creators of the superheroes gained their cultural power and established a crucial place in the modern imagination This history of the birth of superhero comics highlights three pivotal figures The stor I read this as background for Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier Clay Research soon turned into fascination with the true story of the origins of the comic book and the superheroes that made the genre a cultural phenomenon Well written and documented Men of Tomorrow is an important social history of the comic book in America Jones has done a fine job of interweaving the stories of the creators writers and artists and the publishing entrepreneurs who made the comic book successful and took advantage of the underpaid and often anonymous talent to earn their fortunes The book is dense with names especially since many of the Jewish authors and artists with Eastern European names took one or pen names during their careers in order to appear less foreign to the American public I felt at times that I needed to make charts to keep up with the large cast of characters The work is thoughtful and the reader comes away with real insights into the complicated relationship between social changes in America and the roller coaster history of the comic books and those who created and marketed them The book is illustrated with interesting photographs of several of the principal movers and shakers as well as with reproductions of representative covers and panels from significant comic books Reading it made me want to revisit the superhero comics of my youth

Gerard Jones ↠ Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book text

Y begins early in the last century on the Lower East Side where Harry Donenfeld rises from the streets to become the king of the 'smooshes' soft core magazines with titles like French Humor and Hot Tales Later two high school friends in Cleveland Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel become avid fans of 'scientifiction' the new kind of literature promoted by their favorite I read this a few months before I read The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier Clay and I think I benefited from it This book is the real life version inspiration of Chabon's novel essentially following Jerry Siegel and to an extent Joe Schuster all through the Golden Age of comics and beyond Along the way we get stories from all of the major workhouses in New York including some great anecdotes about Will Eisner like his marathon run to finish a comic with his bullpen in he middle of a blizzard Jones' timeline and narrative is excellent and you really see how the industry grew fell and almost collapsed all together I was able to read Kavalier Clay and find myself picking out who was supposed to represent whom and who was an amalgamation of others Also Bob Kane was a real prick

doc Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book

read epub ¶ Men Of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book Paperback Þ gerard jones ì Animated by the stories of some of the last century's most charismatic and conniving artists writers and businessmen Men of Tomorrow brilliantly demonstrates how the cPulp magazines The disparate worlds of the wise guy and the geeks collide in 1938 and the result is Action Comics #1 the debut of Superman For Donenfeld the comics were a way to sidestep the censors For Shuster and Siegel they were both a calling and an eventual source of misery the pair waged a lifelong campaign for credit and appropriate compensation The New York Growing up in the so called “Silver Age” of comic books ‘50s early ‘60s and being such a geek that I attended San Diego Comic Con before it moved to the convention center it’s a wonder I didn’t read Men of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book before This history rings true for the limited information I have on comic book history reading Wertham’s Seduction of the Innocent many years ago working for a company which briefly published comics Ziff Davis devouring my autographed copy of Will Eisner’s Shop Talk interviews reading about the Kefauver hearings and the end of EC comics and studying a bit about Stan Lee and Jack Kirby—I didn’t say I was a scholar on this and it definitely rings true for my experience in periodicals publication and distribution Not since I read Two Bit Culture The Paperbacking of America have I seen the relationship between printing pulps comics paperbacks and magazines fit together so nicely And since I dealt with specialty shops in distributing my game magazines it doesn’t surprise me when I read about Harry Donenfeld’s pre National Periodicals days of distributing Margaret Sanger’s birth control devices and information along with his skin magazines via burlesue theaters and involvement with Frank Costello and other MafiosiThere are fascinating stories in this history of the comic format The relationship between the strips syndicated in newspapers comic strip collections and comic books was clarified for me as never before I always preferred the latter and it was only in adulthood that someone probably an interview with Neal Adams or a conversation overheard when one of my magazines commissioned an illustration from his studio in the early ‘90s clarified that the strip creators usually kept control of their characters while the “work for hire” comic book work didn’t allow people like Bill Fingers or Jerry Siegel to benefit from their previous work I particularly like the fact that Men of Tomorrow Geeks Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book took the time to tell some of the stories of the business guys and distributors as well as the creators However I was disappointed that this was primarily the story of Siegel and Shuster and the house that Jack Leibowitz built It occasionally mentioned the brief history of EC Comics Lev Gleason Charlton Archie Timely Ziff Davis uality Dell Warren Image and All American though it later became part of National but I feel like a lot of the stories behind those publishing groups still need to be told I liked the part about Martin Goodman but the volume was very light on Marvel Comics’ ancestral publisher and didn’t really deal with the “rest of the story” sufficiently after Jack Kirby left Marvel I wanted to know about the short lived Jack Kirby Comics line just before he died The truth is that I was fascinated by this history but like any fan boy I wanted I wanted to know about Roy Thomas Marv Wolfman and Warren Ellis The brief description of Steve Ditko’s rise was fascinating but I was disappointed not to read about Gardner Fox Archie Goodman both Romitas and the origin of Dark Horse Comics In spite of my interest in the subject matter I learned a lot from this volume I’ve even recommended it to my local comic book guy